Japan Field Trip June 2017 - Regional Perspectives on Global Geoscience

  • Ready for action on Day 1 
  • Tsukuba Geology Museum 
  • Tsukuba Geology Museum 
  • Checking out the Iwaki Formation  
  • Finding the contact 
  • Nakahama Elementary School, Sendai Plain. High-water mark from the 2011 tsunami disaster is visible (blue sign) 
  • On a newly build tsunami barrier, Sendai Plain 
  • Entering a mine in the Ishikawa pegmatite, Ryoke Belt 
  • Checking out the Ishikawa pegmatite 
  • Checking out the Ishikawa pegmatite 
  • Seeing meter-long tourmaline crystals and other mineralogical delights, Ishikawa 
  • Looking for mineral treasures in Ishikawa 
  • Looking for mineral treasures in Ishikawa 
  • Exploring the Ryoke Belt 
  • Checking out a pyroclastic flow deposit, Niigata 
  • Pyroclastic flow selfie, Niigata 
  • Pyroclastic flow deposit with Yoshi for scale, Niigata 
  • Lake Nojiri, home to famous Naumann Elephant fossils 
  • Finding Devonian fossils, Takayama 
  • Searching for the Takadani Granodiorite near Mount Yake 
  • At an exposure of the Median Tectonic Line, a major fault in Japan. We even found pseudotachylite! 
  • Exploring a spectacular Mesozoic bedded chert along the Kiso River, Sakahogi 
  • Kiso River cherts 
  • Kiso River cherts 
  • Checking out a preserved 5 meter fault offset from the 1891 Nobi earthquake, Motosu 
  • A windy day on Mount Ibuki 
  • Mount Ibuki 
  • Checking out the famous Naruto Whirlpools from the bridge 
  • Getting ready to see the Naruto Whirlpools by boat 
  • Naruto Whirlpools 
  • Group photo in front of the Naruto Strait 
  • Puzzling through a tricky outcrop near the Naruto Strait 
  • Hunting for blueschists and eclogites, mount Kotsu, Sanbagawa Belt 
  • Resident metamorphic petrologist Duncan explains it all 
  • Looking for eclogites 
  • Looking for eclogites 
  • A boat trip down the Oboke Gorge to see sedimentary units of the Sanbagawa Belt 
  • The Sakawa Geological Museum 
  • A reproduction of the famous Zalinger Age of Reptiles mural in Sakawa; the original is in the Peabody! 
  • Yoshi checks out an outcrop of the Shimanto Belt 
  • Sandstone outcrop, Eshima, Awaji Island 
  • Sandstone outcrop, Eshima, Awaji Island 
  • Sandstone outcrop, Eshima, Awaji Island 
  • Sandstone Outcrop, Eshima, Awaji Island 
  • Getting ready to brave Mount Fuji on a windy day 
  • Yoshi gets us oriented, Mount Fuji 
  • Mount Fuji 
  • At the rim of Hoei crater, Mount Fuji, site of the 1707 eruption 
  • Hoei crater, Mount Fuji 
  • Trying not to blow away on Mount Fuji 
August 31, 2017

In June 2017, a group of 12 G&G graduate students and faculty visited the geologic highlights of Japan, following up on the Spring 2017 “Regional Perspectives on Global Geoscience” seminar class. The trip was planned by G&G students Duncan Keller, Katelyn Gray, and Yoshi Miyazaki, and the faculty leaders for the trip were Maureen Long and Noah Planavsky. Our two-week adventure ranged across the islands of Honshu, Awaji, and Shikoku and covered a huge range of geologic, geophysical, oceanographic, and climatological features. Highlights included visits to several geologic and fossil museums, a day exploring the Sendai Plain to see features from the 2011 great earthquake and tsunami, a stop to see a Ryoke Belt pegmatite that featured meter-long tourmaline crystals, a view of a spectacular pyroclastic flow deposit on the Sea of Japan, a visit to the youngest exposed granodiorite pluton on Earth, a stop to see an exposure of the Median Tectonic Line, an exploration of the famous Kiso River bedded cherts, a museum stop that featured a preserved 5 meter fault offset from the 1891 Nobi earthquake, a hike up Mount Ibuki, which has some of the heaviest orographic precipitation on Earth, a boat trip to see the Naruto Whirlpools up close, a hike to see blueschists and eclogites of the Sanbagawa Belt, and a hike to Hoei Crater on Mount Fuji. We had a day off for sightseeing in Kyoto and even felt an earthquake (well, some of us did) - a shallow magnitude 5.2 in Nagano Prefecture.