ENERGY STUDIES Courses and Capstone Projects

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COURSE REQUIREMENTS

The requirements for Energy Studies consist of six courses from a list approved by the faculty advisory committee, plus a senior capstone project. No specific courses are required, but there are two distributional requirements: students (1) must take at least one course in each of the three tracks of Energy Studies and (2) can use no more than three courses from their majors to satisfy the six-course requirement. Double majors can use three courses from each of their majors provided that the distributional requirement across the three tracks is satisfied. It is recommended that three of the six courses be upper level courses (300 level or higher). Approved courses completed before a student enrolls in Energy Studies can count toward the requirements, as can pre-approved courses taken during summer sessions at Yale and other institutions. 

The normal rule is that any course taken as Credit/D/Fail cannot count for Energy Studies.

The following courses are recommended as introductions in the three tracks:

I Energy Science and Technology
APHY 100b, Energy Technology and Society (Energy Studies Gateway Course)
G&G 274a, Fossil Fuels and World Energy

II Energy and the Environment
ENVE 120b, Introduction to Environmental Engineering
G&G 140a, Atmosphere, Ocean, and Environmental Change

III Energy and Society: Economic, Political and Social Issues
GLBL 217a, Sustainability in the 21st Century
EVST 247b, Politics of the Environment

COURSES IN ENERGY STUDIES FOR THE 2018-19 ACADEMIC YEAR
The lists below contain the approved courses offered during the 2018-19 Academic Year in each track of Energy Studies. These lists are based on current information in Yale College Programs of Study 2018-2019 (YCPS) and Yale Course Search, but are not exhaustive and may be revised as more information becomes availableMany courses offered in previous years but no longer listed in YCPS were approved for Energy Studies. In addition, courses in the graduate and professional schools can count towards Energy Studies (see below). To simplify the lists, course numbers are given for only one of a course’s departmental listings. For full cross listings, see YCPS or Course Search.

Students or faculty members wishing to have a particular course approved for Energy Studies should send an e-mail to the director (michael.oristaglio@yale.edu), ideally with a copy of the course syllabus.

I Energy Science and Technology
APHY 100b, Energy Technology and Society
CENG 300a, Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics
CENG 315b, Transport Phenomena
CHEM 430a, Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics
EENG 406b, Photovoltaic Energy
G&G 274a, Fossil Fuels and World Energy
G&G 275b, Renewable Energy
MENG 211b, Thermodynamics for Mechanical Engineers
MENG 389b, Mechanical Engineering IV: Fluid and Thermal Energy Science
PHYS 180a, University Physics
PHYS 420a, Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics

The following full-year courses covering a range of topics count as one course in Energy Studies. No more than one such course can be used for the program’s requirements. With permission of the director, students taking only one term of the two-term sequence can still receive one credit in Track 1. 

CHEM 161 and 165, General Chemistry I and II
CHEM 163 and 167, Comprehensive University Chemistry I and II
CHEM 332 and 333, Physical Chemistry with Applications in the Physical Sciences I and II
PHYS 200 and 201, Fundamentals of Physics
PHYS 260 and 261, Intensive Introductory Physics
PHYS 401 and 402, Advanced Classical Physics from Newton to Einstein

II Energy and the Environment
ENVE 120b, Introduction to Environmental Engineering
ENVE 360b, Green Engineering and Sustainable Design
ENVE 373a, Air Pollution Control
ENVE 377a, Water Quality Control
ENVE 416b, Chemical Engineering Process Design
ENVE 448a, Environmental Transport Processes
ENVE 473b, Air Quality and Energy
G&G 010a, Earth, Resources, Energy, and the Environment
G&G 120a, Earth’s Changing Climate
G&G 140a, Atmosphere, Ocean, and Environmental Change
G&G 207b, The Science of Water
G&G 216b, Global Warming: Climate Physics
G&G 322a, Physics of Weather and Climate

III Energy and Society
AMST 236b, American Energy History
AMST 425b, American Culture and the Rise of the Environment
ANTH 409a, Climate and Society from Past to Present
ANTH 473b, Abrupt Climate Change and Societal Collapse
ARCG 226a, Global Environmental History
ECON 330b, The Economics of Natural Resources
ECON 412b, International Environmental Economics
EVST 226a, Global Environmental History
EVST 228a, Climate Change and the Humanities 
EVST 255b, Environmental Politics and Law
GLBL 217a, Sustainability in the 21st Century
HIST 042a, Oil and Empire
PLSC 212a, Democracy and Sustainability
PLSC 219b, Politics of the Environment

PROVISIONAL COURSES IN ENERGY STUDIES
Many courses with broad themes touching on science, technology, and society can count in Energy Studies, provided that the student does substantive work in the course on energy-related topics. “Substantive work” generally means assignments counting for 50% or more of the course’s standard requirements, such as in-term essays or problem sets or a final essay or presentation. Students are normally required to notify the director in advance of their intention to use a provisional course for Energy Studies.

Examples of provisional courses are:

APHY 050a, Science of Modern Technology and Public Policy
ENG 459a, Writing about Science, Medicine, and the Environment
EVST 347b, Biogeochemistry and Pollution
GLBL 253b, Globalization Space

COURSES IN THE GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS
Many courses in the graduate and professional schools (500 level or higher) qualify for Energy Studies. Students should first confirm with the Dean’s Office that a specific graduate course counts for a full course credit in Yale College, which is a requirement for counting in Energy Studies. Questions about whether a course’s content qualifies for Energy Studies can be submitted via e-mail to the program director (michael.oristaglio@yale.edu), ideally with a copy of the course syllabus. 

Examples of graduate level courses whose content qualifies for Energy Studies are:

CHEM 530a, Statistical Methods and Thermodynamics
ENAS 521a, Classical and Statistical Thermodynamics
ENAS 603a, Energy, Mass, and Momentum Processes
ENAS 609b, Nanotechnology for Energy
ENAS 806b, Photovoltaic Energy
F&ES 800a, Energy Economics and Policy Analysis
F&ES 823b, Regulation of Energy Extraction
MGT 563b, Energy System Analysis

CAPSTONE PROJECTS

Capstone projects are due at the end of the Spring Term, Wednesday, May 8, 2019.

The capstone of Energy Studies is an essay or project in one or more of the curriculum’s three tracks: (i) Energy Science and Technology; (ii) Energy and the Environment; and (iii) Energy and Society: Economic, Political and Social Issues.

The capstone will normally take one of the following forms: (a) a senior essay in the student’s major, (b) a senior project in the student’s major, (c) a project undertaken independently in the senior year, (d) a group project undertaken in the senior year, or (e) a summer internship undertaken after completion of the junior year.

All capstone projects must be approved by the faculty advisory committee for Energy Studies and documented in a written report submitted during the senior year. Guidelines for the different forms of the capstone project are given below.

An individual or group project in a credited course at Yale, or in a summer academic program credited by Yale, can serve as the capstone project for Energy Studies, but the course itself cannot also be used to satisfy the course requirements for Energy Studies. 

CAPSTONE PROJECT GUIDELINES
The following guidlines apply to the different forms of capstone projects:

  • (a) A senior essay in the student’s major can serve as the capstone project provided that a topic from one of the three tracks in Energy Studies is an integral part of the essay. The guideline is that the Energy Studies topic should constitute at least 30% of the senior essay (or at least 4000 words, whichever is shorter). The senior essay itself can be submitted as the written report documenting the Energy Studies capstone project, after the student’s department has accepted the essay. Use of a senior essay as the capstone for Energy Studies requires the written approval of the director of Energy Studies and the director of undergraduate studies (DUS) in the student’s major.
  • (b) A senior project in the student’s major can serve as the capstone project provided that a topic from one of the three tracks in Energy Studies is an integral part of the project. Many departments require submission of a written report documenting the senior project, which can be submitted as the capstone project, after the student’s department has  accepted the report. If the senior project for the student’s major culminates in a presentation instead of a written report, the presentation file (PowerPoint or PDF) can be submitted as the capstone project, after the student’s department has accepted the presentation. The guidelines given above for senior essays also apply to the write‑up of a senior project intended to satisfy the capstone requirement, that is, about 30% of the project write-up or presentation should be devoted to the Energy Studies topic. Use of a senior project as the capstone for Energy Studies requires the written approval of the director of Energy Studies and the director of undergraduate studies (DUS) in the student’s major.
  • (c) An individual independent study project undertaken in the senior year and documented in a written report can serve as the capstone project provided that the project treats a topic from one of the three tracks in Energy Studies. The guideline for the written report on an independent study project is an essay at least 4000 words in length, in the accepted style of a term essay for a credited independent study course in the department of the student’s major. 
  • (d) A group project undertaken in the senior year by no more than three students and documented in a written report can serve as the capstone project provided that the project treats a topic from one of the three tracks in Energy Studies. The guideline for the written report on a group project is an essay at least 6000 words in length, in the accepted style of a term essay for a credited independent study course in the department of the one of the students’ majors. 
  • (e) An internship undertaken after completion of the junior year and documented in a written report can serve as the capstone project provided that the internship is in a field closely related to one of the three tracks in Energy Studies. The guideline for the written report on an internship is an essay at least 4000 words in length, in the accepted style of a term essay for a credited independent study course in the department of the student’s major.

COVER PAGE (COVER SLIDE)
Submissions of capstone projects must include a cover page (or cover slide in the case of presentations) with the following items:

  • Name of Student
  • Major
  • Residential College
  • Date
  • This {SELECT ONE: senior essay, senior project, independent study project, group project, internship project} is submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the Multidisciplinary Academic Program in Energy Studies at Yale College.